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2020 Youth4Education Lead Activists Announced

Posted By NYLC, Wednesday, January 22, 2020

NYLC would like to announce our 2020 Youth4Education Lead Activists addressing issues of education equity! These young leaders will implement service-learning programs in their communities under the guidance of NYLC staff and Youth Advisory Council members in order to fight for a quality education for every young person.

 

Hoang, Bellaire High School, Texas, USA

"When it comes to educational equity in my community," Hoang says, "I firmly believe that everybody should have the same opportunity no matter his or her race or gender." Hoang wants to implement more hands-on learning experiences in his school's classrooms and raise funds to pay for students' educations worldwide.

 

Maria, YES Prep, Texas, USA

Maria understands that each student's needs require a different educational approach. "Giving every child the same tools for education doesn't solve every child's problem," Maria says. "Everyone has different ways of learning. Education equity will ensure everyone gets what they truly need [in order] to learn." Maria's goal is to bring hope to students who feel that their educational system is failing them.

 

Widya Astuti, Malang, Indonesia

Widya Astuti hopes to help students in her community achieve their goals, and teach them in a fun, engaging way. Through hands-on lessons and individualized learning, Widya Astuti wants to give every student in her school a method to learn effectively. "I want to always be connected with education wherever, whenever and with anyone," Widya Astuti says. "I want to continue to learn and teach as much as I can."

 

Sydnee, Clarksville High School, Tennessee, USA

Inspired by her school's existing Youth4Ed club, Sydnee and her team want to help students take advantage of their local community center and build resources and skills together. "I envision a Youth4Ed group that strives to create a safe space in their community for those who are affected by poor education equity," Sydney says. "I see a concrete group of students who are fearless in fighting for something they believe in.

 

Sophia, East Chapel Hill High School, North Carolina, USA

"When I think of Youth4Education," says Sophia, "I think of my fellow peers and other kids in my community who don't have the same opportunity as others for some thing that is completely circumstantial." Stunned by a study that showed her school district with the second widest achievement gap in the nation, Sophia realized she needed to advocate for her fellow students and start difficult conversations about students left behind. Sophia wants to create a diverse board of students to discuss issues related to education equity and bring them directly to their school's administration.

Tags:  lead activists  service-learning  youth voice  Youth4Education 

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2019: A Year of Renewal

Posted By NYLC, Wednesday, December 18, 2019

By: Amy Meuers, NYLC CEO

 

At the National Youth Leadership Council, we develop young people to be civically informed and engaged global citizens who strive to create a more just, sustainable, and peaceful world. We believe in the power of youth and adults working together, in partnership, to tap into the passion, creativity, and ingenuity of all young people to make meaningful change happen.

 

In 2019, we have seen young people making powerful, lasting change around the world.  Just two weeks ago, 16 year-old Greta Thunberg was named Time Magazine’s Person of the Year for her unwavering commitment to move world leaders to address climate change. Greta has inspired millions of people – both young and young at heart – from across the globe to lend their voices in protest against the lack of action on climate change.  

 

2020 National Service-Learning Conference keynote speaker, Ekansh Tambe, is a high school sophomore in Texas educating people on the issue of immigration. Through his amazing photography, he chronicles the fence, the culture, and the people along most of the 1,900 miles of the US-Mexican land border. The project educates through the stories of the border security, the residents, immigrants, and federal agents.

 

Also this month, NYLC’s  very own Youth Advisory Council member Carmen Lopez Villamil was quoted on the front page of the New York Times for her activism for school integration. Carmen attends Beacon High School in New York where she leads a Youth4Education club and helped to organize a strike against the school’s admittance practices.  These young voices, along with the millions of others who stood with them, are making meaningful change happen.

 

Youth4Education is a youth-led movement to advance education equity through service-learning by creating safe spaces for vulnerable discussions, turning discussion into action, creating positive youth-adult, and improving school climate. Through Youth4Ed, NYLC reached more than 1,600 students directly in 2019.

 

We also had the opportunity to extend our impact this year in the Afterschool Service-Learning initiative through a generous grant from the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation. NYLC supports  the advancement of service-learning with seven state networks including:

 

  • OregonAsk
  • Michigan Afterschool Partnership
  • New Jersey School-Age Care Coalition
  • Pennsylvania Statewide Afterschool/Youth Development Network
  • Tennessee Afterschool Network
  • Georgia Statewide Afterschool Network
  • Massachusetts Afterschool Partnership

 

These partnerships have ensured that thousands of students are exposed to service-learning and the multitude of benefits that it brings including academic, 21st Century, leadership, and social emotional skills because they are physically out in the community, making real change happen. It demonstrates that afterschool programs are developing the next generation of engaged and informed citizens who are ready to address community needs.

 

In addition to our work in afterschool settings, NYLC’s teen driver safety program Project Ignition engaged more than 2,087 students indirectly impacting more than 700,000 people across twenty sites. These teams of students and their adult allies addressed teen-driver safety issues and empowered youth to lead campaigns that make measurable differences in their schools, their communities, and beyond. NYLC is honored to partner with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration to continue this vital work in 2020; saving even more lives through service-learning.

 

Whether advancing service-learning through our annual National Service-Learning Conference; delivering uniquely tailored trainings; creating tool-kits, handbooks, and resources; administering the Service-Learning Network; or by growing programs; NYLC worked alongside our partners and funders to engage more than 300,000 people to create meaningful, lasting change in communities across the globe in 2019. We are excited to see where 2020 takes us as we work with you to “Serve. Learn. Change the world.”!

 

Support the work of NYLC. Learn more at www.nylc.org.

Tags:  2019  National Service-Learning Conference  Project Ignition  service-learning  youth leadership  Youth4Education 

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Unleashing My Voice and Becoming an Advocate: A Story of Success, Failure, and Lessons Learned

Posted By NYLC, Friday, June 1, 2018
Updated: Saturday, August 4, 2018

by Ricky Yoo, Youth Advisory Council member

By listening and working with young people, we can get closer to creating the conditions that all young people need to have a real chance to succeed in school and life.

-John Gompert, President and CEO of America’s Promise Alliance

“You, French Fry. Me, Hamburger,” I proclaimed to my pre-K teacher. She gawked at me with awe. I stared blankly at her as she started to jump and holler, “Ricky! Yes! You, French Fry. Me, Hamburger!” I was stunned, and she, elated.

It was the first time I spoke a complete phrase to my teacher.

As a timid, young boy, my English was elementary and my social skills, even worse. Thus, I spent my words wisely, to persuade teachers to bring me food or request a toy of my choice from the treasure box. But much to the disappointment to me and my peers, my voice would remain buried throughout my adolescence.

Like many pre-teens, I struggled with social anxiety, and I secluded myself. My thoughts were dear to me and my own, and it would remain this way until my freshmen year of high school.

My voice came from humble origins – the bathroom mirror. While my mother disapproved of my loud orations, a toothbrush, a half-spent bar of soap, the allegedly tropical scent of hand wash, were all a familiar audience. Unfortunately, the congeniality of my toiletries starkly contrasted with the judgemental remarks of my classmates. Their mockery, I tolerated, but my feelings of inadequacy, I did not. With hours of practice and deliberation, the stuttering and mumbles were replaced with ferocity and power. Like the budding of a new relationship, I grew a fondness for public speaking. This would leak into different facets of my life.

I developed confidence in my role as a leader as more people began to listen to my voice. My inhibitions dissolved, and my social exposure procured an interest in leadership. The strength of my voice directly correlated with my ability to captivate my teammates, and, indirectly, manage them as well. Workshop and speaking engagement opportunities arose, and, with microphone in hand, I intended to advocate for youth voice.

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Tags:  afterschool  featured  Tags afterschool  Youth Advisory Council  youth leadership  youth voice  Youth4Education 

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