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Service-Learning October Digest 2018

Posted By NYLC, Sunday, April 7, 2019

(This article was originally posted on October 10, 2018 on nylc.org.)

Fall is here and school is back in session. That means service-learning is off and running in classrooms and afterschool programs across the world. Check out some of the great happenings from the past month. Got a program you want to share? Send us an email at nylcweb@nylc.org!

Service Learning Day part of larger focus

On Sept. 18, Ellsworth High School had its annual “Day of Service” event in which students and staff are involved in various service learning activities around the community and in the middle school and elementary school classrooms. This has traditionally been a senior activity but was expanded to include all students this year.

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Service learning success

Sixth graders drop donation boxes around town

If you’ve been shopping in Big Sky this month, you may have noticed colorful donation receptacles popping up around town. If you haven’t, take a closer look—the donation containers were created by Ms. Kayte Cole’s sixth grade homeroom students as a way for them to learn about local nonprofits and the unique satisfaction that comes from giving back to the community.

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Teacher launches her ‘dream’ class where ninth grade students learn through service

This semester, the teacher behind the first service-learning, public high school class in North Carolina is launching a new course for ninth grade students.

Teaching lessons in the classroom and out in the broader world, service learning allows students to use academic knowledge and skills to fix a community problem.

“It’s been my dream to have this program for the last three years,” said Elizabeth Felts, the teacher and creator of the course at New Hanover High School in Wilmington. “To actually see our freshmen be so excited at 14, 15 years old about serving their community is pretty thrilling to me.”

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4-H Junior Homemakers kick off

The Bell County 4-H Junior Homemakers recently met to kick off the 2018-2019 club year. They enjoyed a painting lesson with FCS Agent Rebecca Miller and learned the 4-H Pledge and all about being a 4-H Club member with 4-H Agent Brandy Calvert. Guest Speaker John Day discussed service-learning opportunities with Community Care Outreach Ministries (CCOM). The 4-Hers plan to take his advice “if you see a need, fill a need.” They will complete two service projects this year.

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Tags:  4-H  day of service  service-learning  youth development 

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Talking Turkey

Posted By NYLC, Sunday, April 7, 2019

(This article was originally posted on April 4th, 2018 on nylc.org.)

By: Amy Meuers, NYLC CEO

I had the honor to speak at the Japanese Conference on Philanthropic Education on Saturday, March 17 at Komazawa University, Tokyo. Japan has placed great emphasis on peace education ever since WWII including the incorporation of it in their 9th grade civics classes and in their constitution under Article 9. My participation in the conference was to share how service-learning is a way for students to be active participants in their own education. My desire was to show that when students discover the positive impact they can have in the world – that is when the real learning occurs.

At NYLC, we envision a world where all young people become civically informed and engaged global citizens by participating in service-learning as part of their educational experience. We work with educators (both in the classroom or after school), students, community leaders, and businesses to incorporate peace, justice, and sustainability into the fabric of all education systems by asking students to be of service to their community as part of their educational experience –to learn, lead, and grow through service-learning.

Successful service-learning projects are tied to specific learning objectives, and many of the best are tied to numerous areas of study. For example, when seventh- and eighth-graders studied the historical significance of a local river, they developed projects to build nature trails, tested water samples, documented contamination of the local habitat, and restored historical sites. Their teachers connected those activities to studies in earth science, mathematics, language arts, physical education, music, visual arts, and social studies. These connections not only deepened the impact projects had on learning, but also provided the young people with a broader understanding of how different subjects are interrelated. Service-learning helps students make connections to learning outside the classroom. It is hands-on learning but most importantly, it connects to community and empowers each student to lead change.

The 20th century educator, John Dewey is the founding father of service-learning. It is based on his central tenets of experience and democracy. He wanted to see students experience education. He said, “When the school introduces and trains each child of society into membership within such a little community, saturating him with the spirit of service, and providing him with instruments of effective self-direction, we shall have the deepest and best guarantee of a larger society which is worthy, lovely and harmonious.” Dewey wasn’t the only educator who felt this way. Progressive activist Jane Addams, Brazilian educator Paulo Freire, and Mahatma Gandhi all envisioned education rooted in community and democratic principles.

 It (education) “either functions as an instrument that is used to facilitate the integration of the younger generation into the logic of the present system and bring about conformity to it, or it becomes ‘the practice of freedom,’ the means by which men and women deal critically and creatively with reality and discover how to participate in the transformation of their world.” -Paulo Freire

Transforming the world –powerful stuff. Service-learning encourages students to not only dream of a better future but to create it. It is democracy in action.

As an organization, NYLC has been a champion, a resource, and a contributor to the field of service-learning whether in the United States or in countries around the world. We see ALL young people as active contributors to society, and schools a place where students can act as resources, be active in the learning process, not passive. A place where they produce or contribute to the world, not just a place where they consume. We want all young people to see themselves as someone who can give, lead, and learn. We know that all young people, no matter their background, their abilities, can be leaders through service-learning. It was an honor to bring the tenants of service-learning to Japan and share the tools and resources that have been developed with the educators and students who are passionate about creating a better world for us all.

Tags:  Japan  service-learning  youth development  youth leadership 

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Service-Learning in Japan

Posted By NYLC, Sunday, April 7, 2019

(This article was originally posted on April 4th, 2018 on nylc.org.)

By: Amy Meuers, NYLC CEO

I had the honor to speak at the Japanese Conference on Philanthropic Education on Saturday, March 17 at Komazawa University, Tokyo. Japan has placed great emphasis on peace education ever since WWII including the incorporation of it in their 9th grade civics classes and in their constitution under Article 9. My participation in the conference was to share how service-learning is a way for students to be active participants in their own education. My desire was to show that when students discover the positive impact they can have in the world – that is when the real learning occurs.

At NYLC, we envision a world where all young people become civically informed and engaged global citizens by participating in service-learning as part of their educational experience. We work with educators (both in the classroom or after school), students, community leaders, and businesses to incorporate peace, justice, and sustainability into the fabric of all education systems by asking students to be of service to their community as part of their educational experience –to learn, lead, and grow through service-learning.

Successful service-learning projects are tied to specific learning objectives, and many of the best are tied to numerous areas of study. For example, when seventh- and eighth-graders studied the historical significance of a local river, they developed projects to build nature trails, tested water samples, documented contamination of the local habitat, and restored historical sites. Their teachers connected those activities to studies in earth science, mathematics, language arts, physical education, music, visual arts, and social studies. These connections not only deepened the impact projects had on learning, but also provided the young people with a broader understanding of how different subjects are interrelated. Service-learning helps students make connections to learning outside the classroom. It is hands-on learning but most importantly, it connects to community and empowers each student to lead change.

The 20th century educator, John Dewey is the founding father of service-learning. It is based on his central tenets of experience and democracy. He wanted to see students experience education. He said, “When the school introduces and trains each child of society into membership within such a little community, saturating him with the spirit of service, and providing him with instruments of effective self-direction, we shall have the deepest and best guarantee of a larger society which is worthy, lovely and harmonious.” Dewey wasn’t the only educator who felt this way. Progressive activist Jane Addams, Brazilian educator Paulo Freire, and Mahatma Gandhi all envisioned education rooted in community and democratic principles.

 It (education) “either functions as an instrument that is used to facilitate the integration of the younger generation into the logic of the present system and bring about conformity to it, or it becomes ‘the practice of freedom,’ the means by which men and women deal critically and creatively with reality and discover how to participate in the transformation of their world.” -Paulo Freire

Transforming the world –powerful stuff. Service-learning encourages students to not only dream of a better future but to create it. It is democracy in action.

As an organization, NYLC has been a champion, a resource, and a contributor to the field of service-learning whether in the United States or in countries around the world. We see ALL young people as active contributors to society, and schools a place where students can act as resources, be active in the learning process, not passive. A place where they produce or contribute to the world, not just a place where they consume. We want all young people to see themselves as someone who can give, lead, and learn. We know that all young people, no matter their background, their abilities, can be leaders through service-learning. It was an honor to bring the tenants of service-learning to Japan and share the tools and resources that have been developed with the educators and students who are passionate about creating a better world for us all.

Tags:  Japan  service-learning  youth development  youth leadership 

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Reflecting on 2017

Posted By NYLC, Sunday, April 7, 2019

(This article was originally posted on January 16th, 2018 on nylc.org.)

2017 was a year filled with contention in our government, communities, streets, and schools. We saw mass destruction when three monster hurricanes ravaged Texas, Florida, Puerto Rico and other Caribbean islands within a four-week span and when a lone shooter rained gunfire down upon concert-goers in Las Vegas, Nevada.

2017 was also a year that inspired action and global change. The #MeToo movement encouraged people everywhere to stand up against harassment and injustice, while students across the nation protested everything from race to the President’s decision on DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) program. It was a year when many young people found their voices and the courage to stand up for something they believed in. It was a year when people, both young and old, worked side-by-side to make positive contributions to the world.

At NYLC in 2017, we strove to meet our mission by growing our programs and services that develop young people as civically informed and engaged global citizens. Over the course of the year, we provided support to 15,600 people directly, impacting an estimated 550,000 youth indirectly, reaching an audience of more than three million people across the country and around the world.

Over the course of the year, we worked to instill the skills and knowledge needed so that all young people can make positive contributions to their communities and to the world. We trained teachers and out-of-school time practitioners on how to engage differently with young people, and we trained young people to be active change-makers in their communities. Our Youth Advisory Council directly engaged more than 71,000 young people through Youth4Education, a program that inspires young people to take action on issues of education equity.

We know that doing what is right is not always easy, but it is what is needed. Service-learning is not easy, but when implemented with quality it provides students with the opportunity to develop their moral character and a life-long commitment to serve. It connects communities to classrooms, and challenges students to act on issues that matter to them. It meets academic content standards and it develops civically informed and engaged global citizens. Service-learning helps students do what is right, step out of their comfort zones, and make deep-rooted changes in themselves. It also allows them to change the world.

We hope that 2017 ignited your passion to make positive change and to support young people in becoming active life-long citizens. We are excited to work with you in 2018 to Serve. Learn. Change the world.™

Tags:  civic education  National Youth Leadership Council  service-learning  youth development 

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NYLC Offers New Youth Leadership Training at 2018 Nobel Peace Prize Forum Minneapolis

Posted By NYLC, Wednesday, July 11, 2018
Updated: Saturday, August 4, 2018

As many know, NYLC’s deepest roots are in camp experiences. Always challenging, often mosquito-ridden, and unfailingly life-changing, the National Youth Leadership Training has traveled from St. Louis, to the Cherokee Nation, to San Francisco.

This year, NYLC’s new Youth Leadership Training is coming to Minneapolis’ Augsburg University, Sept. 14-15  and is embedded with an exciting partner: the Nobel Peace Prize Forum. Now, not only do participants get to explore their own identities and leadership skills, but they also get to hear from world leaders recognized for peace-building.

NYLC’s training is designed for young people entering grades 7-12 in the fall, both existing and potential youth leaders are invited to attend in partnership with an adult ally. It’s a great way to kick off a year of civic engagement, student leadership, and/or youth voice — as youths with similar interests learn from one another in the context of a much larger event — the only of its sort outside of the Nobel Peace Prize’s home base in Oslo, Norway.

In this new training, young people will function as a cohort, spending 75% of their time together in hands-on learning through simulations on the intersectionality of race, class, ethnicity, and geography, explorations of personal leadership styles and cultural backgrounds, and action-planning for assessments leading to addressing community needs.

They’ll share in the daily general sessions with the larger audience, hearing from inspiring leaders ranging from those who have worked to bring peace to Colombia after the world’s longest civil war, to those who are working for nuclear disarmament (I-CAN, 2017 Nobel Peace Prize laureate).

Meanwhile, their adult allies will attend other sessions offered through the Forum, learning community- and peace-building strategies through workshop offerings, and rejoining their students at the end of each day for reflection and planning.

It’s a new take on a proven strategy. Register today to join us this fall for an inspiring time in the Twin Cities!

Registration

$75/student
Two-day leadership training including access to Nobel Peace Prize laureates and selected world leaders.

$100/adult
Two-day access to Nobel Peace Prize Forum (discount of more than $30 off general admission), plus two training sessions with youth teams, and the opportunity to apply for a service-learning grant. All youths must be accompanied by an adult.

Tags:  civic engagement  community action  featured  National Youth Leadership Training  peace building  service-learning  youth development  youth leadership  youth voice 

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